Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan – Chittorgarh

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Incredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : Chittorgarh
Incredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : Chittorgarh
Incredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : ChittorgarhIncredible India - Rajasthan : Chittorgarh

Chitaurgarh (Urdu: چِتوڑگڑھ‎), (Hindi: चित्तौड़गढ़) pronunciation (help·info)} (also Chittor, Chittaur, or Chitorgarh) is a city and a municipality in Rajasthan state of western India. It lies on the Berach River, a tributary of the Banas, and is the administrative headquarters of Chittorgharh District and a former capital of the Sisodia clans of Rajputs of Mewar. The city of Chittaurgarh is located on the banks of river Gambhiri and Berach. The district was bifurcated and a new district namely Pratap Garh was created with certain portion taken from Udaipur district in the newly created district of Pratap Garh.

Fiercely independent, the fort of Chittor was under siege thrice and each time they fought bravely and thrice Jauhar was committed by the ladies and children, first led by Rani Padmini, and later by Rani Karnavati. The famous warriors Gora and Badal, in the war against Allaudin Khalji (1303 AD), have become legendary. The sacrifice of Jaimal and Phata in the war against the Mughals (1568 AD) was so great that the Mughal Emperor Akbar installed their statues in the fort of Agra. It has also been land of worship for Meera, the legendary queen disciple of lord Krishna. Chittorgarh is home to the Chittorgarh Fort, the largest fort in Asia.

I loved going around capturing the lifes and times of Chittor.

Thanks to Wikipedia

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Geometry – Inspired and instigated by nature : on my photoblog SREENIViews

Geometry is integral to Nature. Nature, in its myriad forms, has helped us understand and,evolve geometric patterns and constructs.

We, human beings, have adopted these constructs in a variety of ways –

a. Designing monuments and buildings,

b. Embellishing the mega-structures

c. The attires we sport

d. Accessorizing the looks of a human beings

d. To visual presentation of the food!

e. The dance forms mimic the natures patterns

The list is endless. Here, I try to give a form to the conceptual thought that has been lingering….

Colors of Nature

the flowery patterns of the roof interiors

Taj, Vrindavan and Fatehpur Sikri

For the complete geometric story that my brain imagined go ahead and just click.

Incredible India! Fatehpur Sikri – Mughal Architecture at its best (sreeni on road)

The grand entrance to the city of Fatehpur Sikhri
The grand entrance to the city of Fatehpur Sikhri

This is in continuation of the last story on road, that I shared in the previous posting. When we reached Agra with all the intention to see Taj with our kids, after the smooth, pacy and yet the adventurous ride on the new expressway, we got stuck for a couple of hours in the traffic snarls of ill-prepared Agra. Agra never witnessed such flood of vehicles ever in its history, in its narrow lanes. It could not entertain the huge rush from Delhi that took the newly inaugurated expressway. So, quickly we exited and headed towards Fatehpur Sikri, that I have never visited before. Thanks to Indira and Mallika who insisted on going there at any cost to untie the knots at the chisti’s abode that they tied a couple of years ago, praying for our second child. Now that Svwara arrived in our life, we headed to the chisthi.

Thus we reached Fatehpur Sikiri and I was flabbergasted at the expanse of Mughal Architecture and its finery. I am always astonished at the Vision, Design, Execution and craftsmanship that go into making such grand structures, that have been existing in this land of INDIA for a cover 2000-3000 years, many are still standing majestically!

The grand entrance to the city of Fatehpur Sikhri from inside
The grand entrance to the city of Fatehpur Sikhri from inside

According to contemporary historians, Emperor Akbar took a great interest in the building of Fatehpur Sikri and probably also dictated its architectural style. Seeking to revive the splendours of Persian court ceremonial made famous by his ancestor Timur, Akbar planned the complex on Persian principles. But the influences of his adopted land came through in the typically Indian embellishments. The Easy availability of sandstone in the neighbouring areas of Fatehpur Sikri, also meant that all the buildings here were made of the red stone. The imperial Palace complex consists of a number of independent pavilions arranged in formal geometry on a piece of level ground, a pattern derived from Arab and central Asian tent encampments. In its entirety, the monuments at Fatehpur Sikri thus reflect the genius of Akbar in assimilating diverse regional architectural influences within a holistic style that was uniquely his own. Built during the 16th century, the Fatehpur Sikri is one of the best preserved collection of Mughal architecture in India

For the full canvas of sreeni’s photopaintings of the Fatehpur sikri, visit travel blog link ofsreeni on road

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